Covid-19 Update

ORANGE

Porirua City is at the orange setting of the traffic lights protection framework. This means some changes to the way we work and live, as protections are in place to help minimise the spread of Covid-19 in the community. Find out more

For up to date information about alert levels, community cases, and getting tested visit covid19.govt.nz and health.govt.nz.

Council facilities & services Covid-19 welfare information Small business support

Improving Porirua's roads & footpaths

We're working to make Porirua's roads and footpaths safer and easier to use for pedestrians, cyclists and vehicles.

Learn about our current transport improvement projects.

Current projects

Find out more about this project to improve traffic flows, and pedestrian and cycle safety, along Kenepuru Drive and surrounding streets, plus read the latest updates on our dedicated Kenepuru Corridor webpage

Construction complete on Whitby temporary roundabout

A temporary roundabout has been constructed at the intersection of James Cook Drive and Discovery Drive to improve this intersection to handle the increased traffic expected following the opening of Transmission Gully and the associated Whitby link road.

Construction was completed in late October 2021 as planned.

Whitby james cook & disovery drive roundabout 1.jpg

The temporary roundabout will be monitored and adjusted as required before funding is sought to make it a permanent feature.

Roundabout preferred option

In 2020 we ran public consultation around a number of improvement options, with the favoured option, a roundabout, being supported by the majority of those who gave feedback.

Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency (NZTA) modelling estimates that 5000 vehicles are expected to use the intersection daily once Transmission Gully opens. This is up from around 4500 vehicles currently.  Further modelling suggests that by 2031 the number of vehicles using the intersection each day could rise to 6000.

Just two non-injury crashes have been reported at or near the intersection in the past 10 years

Following the opening of Transmission Gully and the Whitby link road, traffic modelling has projected that a roundabout will operate well during the morning peak period with only minor delays during the evening peak period

Looking forward to 2031 it is projected that a roundabout will operate well during peak periods with only minor delays expected on the James Cook Drive southern approach during the evening peak period. Early cost estimates for this project were between $250,000 and $300,000

Advantages

Balances traffic flows evenly on all approaches during peak periods.

  • Reduces vehicle speeds
  • Safer pedestrian crossing facilities can be introduced
  • Performance beyond 2031 is acceptable
  • Safer for cyclists

Q&A

Please find below answers to common questions that were asked by residents in feedback.

Q. What are the forecasted traffic volumes using the intersection during morning and evening peak periods?

A. Following the projected opening of Transmission Gully and the associated Whitby Link Road in 2021, it is estimated that around 500 vehicles will travel through the James Cook Drive/Discovery Drive intersection during the AM and PM peak hour periods. This number is projected to increase to 600 by 2031.These peak hour vehicles volumes represent 10% of the daily traffic volumes projected to be using the intersection in the future.

Q. Is it possible to introduce two lane approaches as part of the roundabout design to improve traffic flow at busy times?

A. Intersection modelling demonstrates that a roundabout with single lane approaches will operate well and continue to do so to beyond 2031. It is crucial that the risk of crashes occurring at the intersection is reduced. This is achieved by encouraging reduced speeds on approach to the roundabout through a variety of design techniques. The introduction of two lane approaches makes it much harder to reduce speeds through design and does little to improve safety. It is also not warranted as vehicle delay and associated congestion are projected to be manageable with the existing proposed layout well into the future.

Q. What consideration has been given to cyclists and pedestrians using the intersection?

A. As covered briefly above, a key driver in upgrading this intersection is to better manage and improve safety for all road users. This will be achieved through a design that keeps speeds below 30km/h at the roundabout. This will reduce the risk for cyclists and allow them to share the road more safely with vehicle traffic. We will also look at using road markings to indicate to drivers that cyclists may be present at the intersection. The option for a bypass for cyclists will also be investigated. Crossing points for pedestrians will be provided on all approaches at a safe distance away from the roundabout. These crossings will feature central refuge islands and hold rails to allow pedestrians to cross the road in two goes, which is particularly important for the mobility impaired and elderly.

Q. How will the side roads along James Cook Drive & Discovery Drive be affected following the intersection upgrade and the opening of Transmission Gully?

A. It is anticipated that reducing vehicle speeds and balancing traffic flows at the roundabout will provide sufficient gaps in traffic flow to allow vehicles on the side roads to safely join the main traffic flow. The roundabout will be instrumental in improving traffic flows through the intersection, as it stands currently.


If you have any questions, please contact Porirua City Council Customer Liaison Manager (Transport) Claire Giblin claire.giblin@poriruacity.govt.nz

Stage one of a project to upgrade the shared pathway though Pukerua Bay was completed in July 2021.

Stage two funding has been secured from Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency and the programme of work is being developed.

Stage one of the work included:

  • Widening the zig zag pathway between Haunui Road and SH1 to make it easier for cyclists, particularly on the bends. This work included tree removal, re-asphalting the pathway and introducing holdrail in places.
  • Improved pathway directional signage from the lookout at the northern end of Pukerua Bay to Porirua Railway Station.
  • Pedestrian improvements through the northern lookout site.

Porirua City managed the project, which was 100 percent funded by Waka Kotahi through its programme of highway cycle improvements.

The Fantame Street community and Council have been working together to design and make changes to Fantame Street, so the area is nicer and safer for people to use. We’ve also taken the opportunity to make the Castor Crescent and Fantame Street intersections with Warspite Avenue safer.

Find out more about this project

We’re trialing a new approach to sharing information about Porirua's annual stormwater maintenance programme through a new GIS map. It's a work in progress and at this stage we're developing the map to give details about the stormwater maintenance we do in the Karehana Park and James Street catchments in Plimmerton. Find out more


Other roading issues

The Rural Address Property Identification (RAPID) System is a standard numbering system for rural properties in New Zealand.

Porirua City Council allocates the RAPID number for new rural properties, which is based on the distance to a property entrance from a clearly defined reference point, usually the beginning of the road on which it is located. (*The street number of a rural address is the RAPID number.)

As with all Territorial Authorities, it’s our responsibility to allocate addresses to all properties according to the AS/NZS 4819:2011 Rural and Urban Addressing Standards and LINZ’s 2019 Guidelines for Addressing In-fill Developments.

We then inform Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) of all newly allocated addresses which are added to the LINZ Address Information Management System (AIMS) Database.

Emergency Services use the address information from the AIMS database to locate properties.

To make it easier for emergency services to identify rural properties at night, rural property owners can apply to Council to have a RAPID number post with reflectorised numbers installed at the road entrance to their property entrance. This service is provided at Council's cost.

If you own a rural property and would like to apply to have a RAPID number post installed, please contact Council


What is Porirua City’s roading network?

Our road network covers 295 kilometres of sealed roads, 23 bridges, five footbridges, almost 400 kilometres of kerb and channel, four kilometres of culverts, 44,500 traffic signs, three sets of traffic signals and 14 car parking lots.

We monitor all construction and repair works on the city’s roads by other council's, utilities companies, contractors and the public. The New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA) manages State Highway 1 running north-south through the middle of the city and State Highway 58, which runs east-west and connects State Highway 1 with the Hutt Valley.


Procurement Strategy for Transport

Porirua is experiencing and planning for additional considerable growth. Annual residential growth is over twice the historical average, and there are major investments in the region such as the Eastern Porirua Regeneration Project, Porirua Adventure Park, Kenepuru Landing, Plimmerton Farms etc. 

This growth, and the completion of major projects such as Transmission Gully will increase the pressure on our roading and transport network.  

Porirua City Council (Council) has undertaken significant long-term planning with a Growth Strategy 2018 to 2048 and a Long-Term Infrastructure Strategy 2018 to 2038. 

To accompany these and Council’s other planning initiatives, this procurement strategy outlines how Council will plan and procure the delivery of projects and services to support the transport network. 


Download the NZTA / Porirua City Council Procurement Strategy for Roading and Transport activities